Facts and Myths About Urinary Incontinence in Older Adults

Urinary incontinence in older adults can be an embarrassing subject for those who experience it. The preconception behind the problem frequently contributes to individuals having either a lack of facts or believing in some common myths about incontinence. Following are some incontinence myths and the facts to be aware of instead:

Common Causes of Urinary Incontinence in Seniors

Incontinence, or reduced bladder control, is a disturbing and delicate issue, particularly for seniors. It can trigger a number of problems, from skin sores to social reclusiveness for individuals who are uncomfortable with leaving home in case of an “accident.” But while bladder leakage causes approximately 25 million people in America to suffer with difficulties, the affliction seldom receives the attention and conversation it needs. With the lack of communication…

Senior Vision: Warning Signs that May Indicate Impairment

When taking care of elderly parents, understand that discussing health issues is hard for many older individuals. They might believe their health issues are their business and no one else’s, or they might possibly be fearful that if they admit to experiencing problems, they could compromise their ability to remain independent. This is oftentimes the situation regarding vision loss.

New Chronic Disease Care Management Approach Puts Patient’s Goals First

Regarding chronic diseases, seniors are usually the experts, hands down, with as many as three out of four older persons impacted by a number of conditions that are ongoing, require extensive medical attention, and put limitations on activities. With the continuous barrage of bloodwork and other exams, physicians’ appointments and procedures and medications, chronic disease care management often takes both a physical and emotional toll, and that can quickly become…

Aging in Place – Is Staying at Home an Option?

We all face a number of critical crossroads in life, when decisions we make will result in far-reaching effects. The career we choose. Who (or whether) to marry. Whether or not to have children. And as we age, another life-changing decision needs to be made: should we move into an assisted living environment so that we have the level of care needed during our years of aging? Or is aging…

Be Informed of Risk Factors and Resources for Fall Prevention Safety

Perhaps you’ve been beside a loved one at the hospital and noticed the nurse attaching a brightly colored “FALL RISK” band to his/her wrist, alerting the medical team to this increased risk. This allows extra safety measures to be taken to keep patients safe during medical procedures. However, many do not know that a fall risk exists even in routine, everyday life among individuals diagnosed with these conditions:

Best Ways for Dealing with Siblings and Elderly Parents with Care Needs at Home

When we were young, we figured out how to share toys and games as well as the attention of our parents, and those same feelings likely carry with us well into the adult years. As nice as it is to have brothers and sisters, there also are times it can bring about heightened stress levels, such as when caring for aging parents. While loving each other and taking into account…

Learn How to Recognize the Signs of Elder Care Abuse

While it goes without saying that abusing an older adult is something that would never even occur to most people, it’s a tragically typical occurrence in the U.S. Elder care abuse happens in many ways, from emotional to physical, and it affects the most frail and vulnerable among us. Considering that elder care abuse is typically a voiceless problem, it’s crucial for families and friends of older individuals to be…

Respite Care Offers Practical Help Following a Stroke

Enduring and going through recovery following a stroke is an emotionally and physically challenging undertaking, and the main thing you long for is to return to your everyday life. However, because more than 2/3 of survivors typically have some means of disability, as reported by the National Stroke Association, in-home safety adjustments may be needed to make post-stroke life easier and safer.

Learn to Recognize the Warning Signs of a Stroke

Stroke, according to the National Stroke Association, is listed as the fifth leading reason for death in the U.S., with an annual count of about 800,000 individuals suffering from a stroke. This signifies that every 40 seconds somebody in some location in our nation experiences a stroke. And every four minutes somebody dies from a stroke.